New MLA Guidelines for Citing Sources

Posted on September 11, 2016 by Lesley Arnold

I like a teacher who gives you something to take home to think about besides homework. ~Lily Tomlin as “Edith Ann”

The teacher who is indeed wise does not bid you to enter the house of his wisdom but rather leads you to the threshold of your mind. ~Kahlil Gibran

I’ve taken these quotes from The Quote Garden that I love using to find good quotes for a piece I may be writing. I would cite it like this:
Guillemets, Terri. “Quotations About Teachers.” The Quote Garden. www.quotegarden.com/teachers.html
When writing a research report or an essay, it’s important that you know the rules and guidelines for writing a bibliography, using images, or using quotations from research sources. Oak Meadow students are asked to use the MLA style of creating and formatting citations. There are new guidelines this year! The goal of the new MLA citation guidelines is to make things easier to read and write, and more consistent, regardless of medium. Hooray!

Quick Guide to MLA Citations 2016

MLA released its 8th edition in 2016, unveiling simplified citation guidelines. Let the rejoicing begin! The following information has been updated to reflect these new guidelines, which aim for a more universal, consistent format regardless of the source medium. Most notable are the following changes:

  • No longer include the city of publication for print publishers.
  • No longer include the medium (print, web, film, etc.).
  • Include URL in website citations.
  • No longer include n.d. (no date) if website/article date is unknown .
  • Date accessed by you is optional for website citations.
  • Make entries as consistent as possible in terms of information and punctuation.

Feel free to continue to use the previous MLA style as long as you’d like–it’s still correct. The new style is more streamlined and hopefully will be easier to learn, use, and read. For those who want all the details, read this.

MLA Guidelines for Citing Sources (updated 2016):

For print sources, include the following:
Author last name, first name. Title. Publishing company, year.
Here is an example:
Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island. Dover, 1993.
When citing online sources, use this format:
Author last name, first name (if known). “Title of article.” Website. Organization,
publication date (if known). URL (without http://, brackets, or ending punctuation)
Here is an example:
Bradbury, Lorna. “25 Classic Novels for Teenagers.” Telegraph.co.uk. The Telegraph, 5 April 2012. www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/bookreviews/9189047/25-classic-novels-for-teenagers.html
Website dates are given in this format: day month year. Longer months are abbreviated: Jan, Nov. You can delete the http// from the URL.
When citing an online video clip (such as YouTube):
Author last name, first name (if known). “Title of article.” Website. Organization, publication date. URL
Here is an example:
Schlickenmeyer, Max. “The Most Astounding Fact—Neil deGrasse Tyson.” YouTube. YouTube, 2 Mar. 2012. www.youtube.com/watch?v=9D05ej8u-gU
When citing a film, here is the format:
Film Title. Dir. First name Last name. Perf. First name Last name. Distributor, year of release.
Note: Dir. stands for director, and Perf. stands for performers. You can list as many or few performers as you like.
Here’s an example:
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Dir. Chris Columbus. Perf. Daniel Radcliff, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Alan Rickman, Robbie Coltraine and Tom Felton. Warner Brothers, 2001.
For most purposes a simple citation that includes the creator’s name (if you can find it) and/or the original source is enough. If you found the image on the web, try to provide a link back to the source.
When in doubt, visit the MLA Citation Guide.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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